Crowdfunding, What It Means To You


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Read the transcript of “Crowdfunding pt. 1: The Big Picture” here (PDF)

Read the transcript of “Crowdfunding pt. 2: What Does it Mean to You” here (PDF)

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The Solari Report 2013-09-19

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The Solari Report 2013-09-19

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The Solari Report 2013-09-19

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The Solari Report 2013-09-19

Hi Catherine,

I’m looking forward to your presentation on crowdfunding this Thursday. You may recall, I’m working on a start-up here in Washington State in the newly legalized cannabis market authorized by I-502. Recently, James Cole at the Department of Justice has issued guidance on Federal oversight of these markets in Washington and Colorado <a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/164023725/DOJ-Memorandum-on-Marijuana-Laws&quot; /a)

I am often asked: 'why not utilize crowdfunding for this start-up?' The easy answer is 'no': Washington State rules and regulations require a verifiable investor who is subject to a background check, to prevent felons and drug cartels from entering the legal market system. Yet, this question continues to present itself. It's a question that applies to any other regulated business: wine, beer, spirits.

Can crowdfunding become a source of capital for these highly regulated sectors of the economy?

Kind regards,
Michael

  • Hi Catherine,

    Abebooks is a great source for used books as noted in this weeks audio, though it’s worth noting that Amazon bought it and is the proud parent!

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